Book cover of Dinner with the President: Food, Politics, and a History of Breaking Bread at the White House by Alex Prud'homme
Biography & Autobiography

Dinner with the President: Food, Politics, and a History of Breaking Bread at the White House

A wonderfully entertaining, often surprising history of presidential taste, from the grim meals eaten by Washington and his starving troops at Valley Forge to Trump’s fast-food burgers and Biden’s ice cream—what they ate, why they ate it, and what it tells us about the state of the nation—from the coauthor of Julia Child’s best-selling memoir My Life in France […Learn More]

Book cover of Egg: A Dozen Ovatures by Lizzie Stark
Biological Sciences

Egg: A Dozen Ovatures

An unconventional history of the world’s largest cellular workhorse, from chickens to penguins, from art to crime, and more.

The egg is a paradox—both alive and not alive—and a symbol as old as culture itself. In this wide-ranging and delightful journey through its natural and cultural history, Lizzie Stark explores the egg’s deep meanings, innumerable uses, and metabolic importance through a dozen dazzling specimens. […Learn More]

Book cover of Ultra-Processed People: The Science Behind Food That Isn't Food by Chris Van Tulleken
Food & Wine

Ultra-Processed People: The Science Behind Food That Isn’t Food

A manifesto to change how you eat and how you think about the human body.

It’s not you, it’s the food.

We have entered a new age of eating. For the first time in human history, most of our calories come from an entirely novel set of substances called Ultra-Processed Food. There’s a long, formal scientific definition, but it can be boiled down to this: if it’s wrapped in plastic and has at least one ingredient that you wouldn’t find in your kitchen, it’s UPF. […Learn More]

Book cover of Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach
Biological Sciences

Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal

“America’s funniest science writer” (Washington Post) takes us down the hatch on an unforgettable tour. The alimentary canal is classic Mary Roach terrain: the questions explored in Gulp are as taboo, in their way, as the cadavers in Stiff and every bit as surreal as the universe of zero gravity explored in Packing for Mars. Why is crunchy food so appealing? Why is it so hard to find words for flavors and smells? Why doesn’t the stomach digest itself? How much can you eat before your stomach bursts? Can constipation kill you? Did it kill Elvis […Learn More]

Book cover of The Fish Market: Inside the Big-Money Battle for the Ocean and Your Dinner Plate by Lee van der Voo
Biological Sciences

The Fish Market: Inside the Big-Money Battle for the Ocean and Your Dinner Plate

Gulf Wild — the first seafood brand in America to trace each fish from the sea to the table — emerged after grouper, the star of fried fish sandwiches, fell off menus due to overfishing. The brand was born when the government privatized the rights to fish to fix the problem. Through traceability, Gulf Wild has met burgeoning consumer demand for domestic, sustainable seafood, selling in boutique grocers and catapulting grouper from the hamburger bun to the white tablecloth. […Learn More]

Book cover of The Oldest Cure in the World: Adventures in the Art and Science of Fasting by Steve Hendricks
Food & Wine

The Oldest Cure in the World: Adventures in the Art and Science of Fasting

A journalist delves into the history, science, and practice of fasting, an ancient cure enjoying a dynamic resurgence.

When should we eat, and when shouldn’t we? The answers to these simple questions are not what you might expect. As Steve Hendricks shows in The Oldest Cure in the World, stop eating long enough, and you’ll set in motion cellular repairs that can slow aging and prevent and reverse diseases like diabetes and hypertension. […Learn More]