Book cover of Cobalt Red: How the Blood of the Congo Powers Our Lives by Siddhartha Kara
Africa

Cobalt Red: How the Blood of the Congo Powers Our Lives

Cobalt Red is the searing, first-ever exposé of the immense toll taken on the people and environment of the Democratic Republic of the Congo by cobalt mining, as told through the testimonies of the Congolese people themselves. Activist and researcher Siddharth Kara has traveled deep into cobalt territory to document the testimonies of the people living, working, and dying for cobalt. […Learn More]

Book cover of Ultra-Processed People: The Science Behind Food That Isn't Food by Chris Van Tulleken
Food & Wine

Ultra-Processed People: The Science Behind Food That Isn’t Food

A manifesto to change how you eat and how you think about the human body.

It’s not you, it’s the food.

We have entered a new age of eating. For the first time in human history, most of our calories come from an entirely novel set of substances called Ultra-Processed Food. There’s a long, formal scientific definition, but it can be boiled down to this: if it’s wrapped in plastic and has at least one ingredient that you wouldn’t find in your kitchen, it’s UPF. […Learn More]

Book cover of Poverty, by America by Matthew Desmond
Politics & Government

Poverty, by America

The United States, the richest country on earth, has more poverty than any other advanced democracy. Why? Why does this land of plenty allow one in every eight of its children to go without basic necessities, permit scores of its citizens to live and die on the streets, and authorize its corporations to pay poverty wages?  […Learn More]

Book cover fo Outlive: The Science and Art of Longevity by Peter Attia
Biological Sciences

Outlive: The Science and Art of Longevity

A groundbreaking manifesto on living better and longer that challenges the conventional medical thinking on aging and reveals a new approach to preventing chronic disease and extending long-term health, from a visionary physician and leading longevity expert […Learn More]

Book cover of Butts: A Backstory by Heather Radke
Health and Psychology

Butts: A Backstory

Whether we love them or hate them, think they’re sexy, think they’re strange, consider them too big, too small, or anywhere in between, humans have a complicated relationship with butts. It is a body part unique to humans, critical to our evolution and survival, and yet it has come to signify so much more: sex, desire, comedy, shame. A woman’s butt, in particular, is forever being assessed, criticized, and objectified, from anxious self-examinations trying on jeans in department store dressing rooms to enduring crass remarks while walking down a street or high school hallways. But why? In Butts: A Backstory, reporter, essayist, and RadioLab contributing editor Heather Radke is determined to find out. […Learn More]

Book cover of What If? 2: Additional Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Munroe
Engineering & Transportation

What If? 2: Additional Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions

The millions of people around the world who read and loved What If? still have questions, and those questions are getting stranger. Thank goodness xkcd creator Randall Munroe is here to help. Planning to ride a fire pole from the Moon back to Earth? The hardest part is sticking the landing. Hoping to cool the atmosphere by opening everyone’s freezer door at the same time? Maybe it’s time for a brief introduction to thermodynamics. Want to know what would happen if you rode a helicopter blade, built a billion-story building, made a lava lamp out of lava, or jumped on a geyser as it erupted? Okay, if you insist. […Learn More]

Book cover of A Taste for Poison: Eleven Deadly Molecules and the Killers Who Used Them by Neil Bradbury
Biography & Autobiography

A Taste for Poison: Eleven Deadly Molecules and the Killers Who Used Them

A brilliant blend of science and crime, A TASTE FOR POISON reveals how eleven notorious poisons affect the body–through the murders in which they were used.

As any reader of murder mysteries can tell you, poison is one of the most enduring—and popular—weapons of choice for a scheming murderer. It can be slipped into a drink, smeared onto the tip of an arrow or the handle of a door, even filtered through the air we breathe. But how exactly do these poisons work to break our bodies down, and what can we learn from the damage they inflict? […Learn More]