Book cover of Blood Memory: The Tragic Decline and Improbable Resurrection of the American Buffalo by Dayton Duncan & Ken Burns
Americas

Blood Memory: The Tragic Decline and Improbable Resurrection of the American Buffalo

n Burns

[su_expand height="0"]The epic story of the buffalo in America, from prehistoric times to today—a moving and beautifully illustrated work of natural history inspired by the PBS series “American Buffalo”

The American buffalo—our nation’s official mammal—is an improbable, shaggy beast that has found itself at the center of many of our most mythic and sometimes heartbreaking tales. […Learn More]

Book cover of Koala: The Extraordinary Life of an Enigmatic Animal by Danielle Clode
Biological Sciences

Koala: The Extraordinary Life of an Enigmatic Animal

An Australian biologist delves into the extraordinary world of koalas, from their ancient ancestors to the current threats to their survival.

Koalas regularly appeared in Australian biologist Danielle Clode’s backyard, but it was only when a bushfire threatened that she truly paid them attention. She soon realized how much she had to learn about these complex and mysterious animals. […Learn More]

Book cover of The Destruction of the Bison by Andrew C. Isenberg
Americas

The Destruction of the Bison: An Environmental History, 1750–1920

For the last twenty years, The Destruction of the Bison has been an essential work in environmental history. Andrew C. Isenberg offers a concise analysis of the near-extinction of the North American bison population from an estimated 30 million in 1800 to fewer than 1000 a century later. His wide-ranging, interdisciplinary study carefully considers the multiple causes, cultural and ecological, of the destruction of the species. The twentieth-anniversary edition includes a new foreword connecting this seminal work to developments in the field – notably new perspectives in Native American history and the rise of transnational history – and placing the story of the bison in global context. […Learn More]

Biological Sciences

Spying on Whales: The Past, Present, and Future of Earth’s Most Awesome Creatures

Whales are among the largest, most intelligent, deepest diving species to have ever lived on our planet. They evolved from land-roaming, dog-sized creatures into animals that move like fish, breathe like us, can grow to 300,000 pounds, live 200 years and travel entire ocean basins. Whales fill us with terror, awe, and affection–yet there is still so much we don’t know about them. Why did it take whales over 50 million years to evolve to such big sizes, and how do they eat enough to stay that big? […Learn More]