Book cover of Crossings: How Road Ecology Is Shaping the Future of Our Planet by Ben Goldfarb
Biological Sciences

Crossings: How Road Ecology Is Shaping the Future of Our Planet

Some 40 million miles of roadways encircle the earth, yet we tend to regard them only as infrastructure for human convenience. While roads are so ubiquitous they’re practically invisible to us, wild animals experience them as entirely alien forces of death and disruption. In Crossings, environmental journalist Ben Goldfarb travels throughout the United States and around the world to investigate how roads have transformed our planet. […Learn More]

Book cover of Beaverland: How One Weird Rodent Made America by Leila Philip
Biological Sciences

Beaverland: How One Weird Rodent Made America

From award-winning writer Leila Philip, BEAVERLAND is a masterful work of narrative science writing, a book that highlights, though history and contemporary storytelling, how this weird rodent plays an oversized role in American history and its future. She follows fur trappers who lead her through waist high water, fur traders and fur auctioneers, as well as wildlife managers, PETA activists, Native American environmental vigilantes, scientists, engineers, and the colorful group of activists known as beaver believers. […Learn More]

Book cover of Pests: How Humans Create Animal Villains by Bethany Brookshire
Biological Sciences

Pests: How Humans Create Animal Villains

An engrossing and revealing study of why we deem certain animals “pests” and others not—from cats to rats, elephants to pigeons—and what this tells us about our own perceptions, beliefs, and actions, as well as our place in the natural world

A squirrel in the garden. A rat in the wall. A pigeon on the street. Humans have spent so much of our history drawing a hard line between human spaces and wild places. When animals pop up where we don’t expect or want them, we respond with fear, rage, or simple annoyance. It’s no longer an animal. It’s a pest. […Learn More]

Book cover of Wild New World: The Epic Story of Animals and People in America by Dan Flores
Biological Sciences

Wild New World: The Epic Story of Animals and People in America 

A deep-time history of animals and humans in North America, by the best-selling and award-winning author of Coyote America.

In 1908, near Folsom, New Mexico, a cowboy discovered the remains of a herd of extinct giant bison. By examining flint points embedded in the bones, archeologists later determined that a band of humans had killed and butchered the animals 12,450 years ago. […Learn More]

Book cover of Poached: Inside the Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking by Rachel Nuwer
Biological Sciences

Poached: Inside the Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking

An intrepid investigation of the criminal world of wildlife trafficking–the poachers, the traders, and the customers–and of those fighting against it

Journalist Rachel Nuwer plunges the reader into the underground of global wildlife trafficking, a topic she has been investigating for nearly a decade. Our insatiable demand for animals–for jewelry, pets, medicine, meat, trophies, and fur–is driving a worldwide poaching epidemic, threatening the continued existence of countless species. […Learn More]

Book cover of A World on the Wing: The Global Odyssey of Migratory Birds by Scott Weidensaul
Biological Sciences

A World on the Wing: The Global Odyssey of Migratory Birds

An exhilarating exploration of the science and wonder of global bird migration.

In the past two decades, our understanding of the navigational and physiological feats that enable birds to cross immense oceans, fly above the highest mountains, or remain in unbroken flight for months at a stretch has exploded. What we’ve learned of these key migrations—how billions of birds circumnavigate the globe, flying tens of thousands of miles between hemispheres on an annual basis—is nothing short of extraordinary. […Learn More]

Book cover of Fox and I: An Uncommon Friendship by Catherine Raven
Biography & Autobiography

Fox and I: An Uncommon Friendship

When Catherine Raven finished her PhD in biology, she built herself a tiny cottage on an isolated plot of land in Montana. She was as emotionally isolated as she was physically, but she viewed the house as a way station, a temporary rest stop where she could gather her nerves and fill out applications for what she hoped would be a real job that would help her fit into society. In the meantime, she taught remotely and led field classes in nearby Yellowstone National Park. […Learn More]

Book cover of The Destruction of the Bison by Andrew C. Isenberg
Americas

The Destruction of the Bison: An Environmental History, 1750–1920

For the last twenty years, The Destruction of the Bison has been an essential work in environmental history. Andrew C. Isenberg offers a concise analysis of the near-extinction of the North American bison population from an estimated 30 million in 1800 to fewer than 1000 a century later. His wide-ranging, interdisciplinary study carefully considers the multiple causes, cultural and ecological, of the destruction of the species. The twentieth-anniversary edition includes a new foreword connecting this seminal work to developments in the field – notably new perspectives in Native American history and the rise of transnational history – and placing the story of the bison in global context. […Learn More]

Book cover of Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law by Mary Roach
Biological Sciences

Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law

What’s to be done about a jaywalking moose? A bear caught breaking and entering? A murderous tree? Three hundred years ago, animals that broke the law would be assigned legal representation and put on trial. These days, as New York Times best-selling author Mary Roach discovers, the answers are best found not in jurisprudence but in science: the curious science of human-wildlife conflict, a discipline at the crossroads of human behavior and wildlife biology.  […Learn More]