Book cover of Cobalt Red: How the Blood of the Congo Powers Our Lives by Siddhartha Kara
Africa

Cobalt Red: How the Blood of the Congo Powers Our Lives

Cobalt Red is the searing, first-ever exposé of the immense toll taken on the people and environment of the Democratic Republic of the Congo by cobalt mining, as told through the testimonies of the Congolese people themselves. Activist and researcher Siddharth Kara has traveled deep into cobalt territory to document the testimonies of the people living, working, and dying for cobalt. […Learn More]

Book cover of Beaverland: How One Weird Rodent Made America by Leila Philip
Biological Sciences

Beaverland: How One Weird Rodent Made America

From award-winning writer Leila Philip, BEAVERLAND is a masterful work of narrative science writing, a book that highlights, though history and contemporary storytelling, how this weird rodent plays an oversized role in American history and its future. She follows fur trappers who lead her through waist high water, fur traders and fur auctioneers, as well as wildlife managers, PETA activists, Native American environmental vigilantes, scientists, engineers, and the colorful group of activists known as beaver believers. […Learn More]

Book cover of The Industrialists: How the National Association of Manufacturers Shaped American Capitalism by Jennifer A. Delton
Biography & History

The Industrialists: How the National Association of Manufacturers Shaped American Capitalism

The first complete history of US industry’s most influential and controversial lobbyist

Founded in 1895, the National Association of Manufacturers―NAM―helped make manufacturing the basis of the US economy and a major source of jobs in the twentieth century. The Industrialists traces the history of the advocacy group from its origins to today, examining its role in shaping modern capitalism, while also highlighting the many tensions and contradictions within the organization that sometimes hampered its mission. […Learn More]

Book cover of Porcelain: A History from the Heart of Europe by Suzanne L. Marchand
Biography & History

Porcelain: A History from the Heart of Europe

Porcelain was invented in medieval China—but its secret recipe was first reproduced in Europe by an alchemist in the employ of the Saxon king Augustus the Strong. Saxony’s revered Meissen factory could not keep porcelain’s ingredients secret for long, however, and scores of Holy Roman princes quickly founded their own mercantile manufactories, soon to be rivaled by private entrepreneurs, eager to make not art but profits […Learn More]

Book cover of Regenesis: Feeding the World Without Devouring the Plane by George Monbiot
Biological Sciences

Regenesis: Feeding the World Without Devouring the Plane

For the first time in millennia, we have the opportunity to transform not only our food system but our entire relationship to the living world.
 
Farming is the world’s greatest cause of environmental destruction—and the one we are least prepared to talk about. We criticize urban sprawl, but farming sprawls across thirty times as much land. We have plowed, fenced, and grazed great tracts of the planet, felling forests, killing wildlife, and poisoning rivers and oceans to feed ourselves. Yet millions still go hungry and the price of food is rising faster than ever. […Learn More]

Book cover of Oil, the State, and War: The Foreign Policies of Petrostates by Emma Ashford
Business & Money

Oil, the State, and War: The Foreign Policies of Petrostates

In a world where oil-rich states are more likely to start war than their oil-dependent counterparts, it’s surprising how little attention is still paid to these so-called petrostates. These states’ wealth props up the global arms trade, provides diplomatic leverage, and allows them to support violent and nonviolent proxies. In Oil, the State, and War, Emma Ashford explores the many potential links between domestic oil production and foreign policy behavior and how oil production influences global politics. […Learn More]

Book cover of The Oil Wars Myth: Petroleum and the Causes of International Conflict by Emily Meierding
Business & Money

The Oil Wars Myth: Petroleum and the Causes of International Conflict

Do countries fight wars for oil? Given the resource’s exceptional military and economic importance, most people assume that states will do anything to obtain it. Challenging this conventional wisdom, The Oil Wars Myth reveals that countries do not launch major conflicts to acquire petroleum resources. Emily Meierding argues that the costs of foreign invasion, territorial occupation, international retaliation, and damage to oil company relations deter even the most powerful countries from initiating “classic oil wars.” […Learn More]

Business & Money

Narconomics: How to Run a Drug Cartel

Picking his way through Andean cocaine fields, Central American prisons, Colorado pot shops, and the online drug dens of the Dark Web, Tom Wainwright provides a fresh, innovative look into the drug trade and its 250 million customers. More than just an investigation of how drug cartels do business, Narconomics is also a blueprint for how to defeat them. […Learn More]

Book Cover of Big Business: A Love Letter to an American Anti-Hero by Tyler Cowen
Business & Money

Big Business: A Love Letter to an American Anti-Hero

An against-the-grain polemic on American capitalism from New York Times bestselling author Tyler Cowen.

We love to hate the 800-pound gorilla. Walmart and Amazon destroy communities and small businesses. Facebook turns us into addicts while putting our personal data at risk. From skeptical politicians like Bernie Sanders who, at a 2016 presidential campaign rally said, “If a bank is too big to fail, it is too big to exist,” […Learn More]