Book cover of The Economic Weapon: The Rise of Sanctions as a Tool of Modern War by Nicholas Mulder
Business & Money

The Economic Weapon: The Rise of Sanctions as a Tool of Modern War

Economic sanctions dominate the landscape of world politics today. First developed in the early twentieth century as a way of exploiting the flows of globalization to defend liberal internationalism, their appeal is that they function as an alternative to war. This view, however, ignores the dark paradox at their core: designed to prevent war, economic sanctions are modeled on devastating techniques of warfare.   […Learn More]

International & World Politics

To Rule Eurasia’s Waves: The New Great Power Competition at Sea

Eurasia’s emerging powers—India, China, and Russia—have increasingly embraced their maritime geographies as they have expanded and strengthened their economies, military capabilities, and global influence. Maritime Eurasia, a region that facilitates international commerce and contains some of the world’s most strategic maritime chokepoints, has already caused a shift in the global political economy and challenged the dominance of the Atlantic world and the United States. […Learn More]

Africa

China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants Are Building a New Empire in Africa

Chinese immigrants of the recent past and unfolding twenty-first century are in search of the African dream. So explains indefatigable traveler Howard W. French, prize-winning investigative journalist and former New York Times bureau chief in Africa and China, in the definitive account of this seismic geopolitical development. China’s burgeoning presence in Africa is already shaping, and reshaping, the future of millions of people. […Learn More]

Business & Money

Trade Wars Are Class Wars: How Rising Inequality Distorts the Global Economy and Threatens International Peace

A provocative look at how today’s trade conflicts are caused by governments promoting the interests of elites at the expense of workers

Trade disputes are usually understood as conflicts between countries with competing national interests, but as Matthew C. Klein and Michael Pettis show, they are often the unexpected result of domestic political choices to serve the interests of the rich at the expense of workers and ordinary retirees. […Learn More]