Book cover of Shadowlands: A Journey Through Britain's Lost Cities and Vanished Villages by Matthew Green
Archaeology

Shadowlands: A Journey Through Britain’s Lost Cities and Vanished Villages

Drowned. Buried by sand. Decimated by plague. Plunged off a cliff. This is the extraordinary tale of Britain’s eerie and remarkable ghost towns and villages; shadowlands that once hummed with life. Peering through the cracks of history, we find Dunwich, a medieval city plunged off a cliff by sea storms; the abandoned village of Wharram Percy, wiped out by the Black Death; the lost city of Trellech unearthed by moles in 2002; and a Norfolk village zombified by the military and turned into a Nazi, Soviet, and Afghan village for training. […Learn More]

Book cover of The Possibility of Life: Science, Imagination, and Our Quest for Kinship in the Cosmos by Jaime Green
Astronomy & Space Science

The Possibility of Life: Science, Imagination, and Our Quest for Kinship in the Cosmos

A spellbinding exploration of alien life and the cosmos, examining how the possibility of life on other planets shapes our understanding of humanity

One of the most powerful questions humans ask about the cosmos is: Are we alone? While the science behind this inquiry is fascinating, it doesn’t exist in a vacuum. It is a reflection of our values, our fears, and most importantly, our enduring sense of hope.   […Learn More]

Book cover of Birnam Wood: A Novel by Eleanor Catton
Fiction

Birnam Wood: A Novel

A landslide has closed the Korowai Pass on New Zealand’s South Island, cutting off the town of Thorndike and leaving a sizable farm abandoned. The disaster presents an opportunity for Birnam Wood, an undeclared, unregulated, sometimes-criminal, sometimes-philanthropic guerrilla gardening collective that plants crops wherever no one will notice. For years, the group has struggled to break even. To occupy the farm at Thorndike would mean a shot at solvency at last. […Learn More]

Book cover of The Edge of the Plain: How Borders Make and Break Our World by James Crawford
History

The Edge of the Plain: How Borders Make and Break Our World

Since the earliest known marker denoting the edge of one land and the beginning of the next—a stone column inscribed with Sumerian cuneiform—borders have been imagined, mapped, moved, and fought over. In The Edge of the Plain, James Crawford skillfully blends history, travel writing, and reportage to trace these borderlines throughout history and across the globe. […Learn More]

Book cover of Magnificent Rebels: The First Romantics and the Invention of the Self by Andrea Wulf
Biography & Autobiography

Magnificent Rebels: The First Romantics and the Invention of the Self

From the best-selling author of The Invention of Nature comes an exhilarating story about a remarkable group of young rebels—poets, novelists, philosophers—who, through their epic quarrels, passionate love stories, heartbreaking grief, and radical ideas launched Romanticism onto the world stage, inspiring some of the greatest thinkers of the time. […Learn More]

Book cover of The Haunting of Alma Fielding: A True Ghost Story by Kate Summerscale
Biography & Autobiography

The Haunting of Alma Fielding: A True Ghost Story

London, 1938. In the suburbs of the city, a young housewife has become the eye in a storm of chaos. In Alma Fielding’s modest home, china flies off the shelves and eggs fly through the air; stolen jewelry appears on her fingers, white mice crawl out of her handbag, beetles appear from under her gloves; in the middle of a car journey, a turtle materializes on her lap. The culprit is incorporeal. As Alma cannot call the police, she calls the papers instead. […Learn More]

Book cover of Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong-and the New Research That's Rewriting the Story by Angela Saini
Biological Sciences

Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong-and the New Research That’s Rewriting the Story

What science has gotten so shamefully wrong about women, and the fight, by both female and male scientists, to rewrite what we thought we knew

For hundreds of years it was common sense: women were the inferior sex. Their bodies were weaker, their minds feebler, their role subservient. No less a scientist than Charles Darwin asserted that women were at a lower stage of evolution, and for decades, scientists—most of them male, of course—claimed to find evidence to support this. […Learn More]