Book cover of Valiant Women: The Extraordinary American Servicewomen Who Helped Win World War II by Lena Andrews
Biography & Autobiography

Valiant Women: The Extraordinary American Servicewomen Who Helped Win World War II 

A groundbreaking new history of the role of American servicewomen in WWII, illuminating their forgotten yet essential contributions to the Allies’ victory.

Valiant Women is the story of the 350,000 American women who served in uniform during World War II. These incredible women served in every service branch, in every combat theater, and in nearly two-thirds of the available military occupations at the time. […Learn More]

Book cover of On a Knife Edge: How Germany Lost the First World War by Holger Afflerbach
History

On a Knife Edge: How Germany Lost the First World War

Was the outcome of the First World War on a knife edge? In this major new account of German wartime politics and strategy Holger Afflerbach argues that the outcome of the war was actually in the balance until relatively late in the war. Using new evidence from diaries, letters and memoirs, he fundamentally revises our understanding of German strategy from the decision to go to war and the failure of the western offensive to the radicalisation of Germany’s war effort under Hindenburg and Ludendorff and the ultimate collapse of the Central Powers. […Learn More]

Book cover of Colossal Ambitions: Confederate Planning for a Post–Civil War by Adrian Brettle
Civil War

Colossal Ambitions: Confederate Planning for a Post–Civil War

Leading politicians, diplomats, clerics, planters, farmers, manufacturers, and merchants preached a transformative, world-historical role for the Confederacy, persuading many of their compatriots to fight not merely to retain what they had but to gain their future empire. Impervious to reality, their vision of future world leadership―territorial, economic, political, and cultural―provided a vitally important, underappreciated motivation to form an independent Confederate republic. […Learn More]

Book cover of The Economic Weapon: The Rise of Sanctions as a Tool of Modern War by Nicholas Mulder
Business & Money

The Economic Weapon: The Rise of Sanctions as a Tool of Modern War

Economic sanctions dominate the landscape of world politics today. First developed in the early twentieth century as a way of exploiting the flows of globalization to defend liberal internationalism, their appeal is that they function as an alternative to war. This view, however, ignores the dark paradox at their core: designed to prevent war, economic sanctions are modeled on devastating techniques of warfare.   […Learn More]

Book cover of Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War by Samuel Moyn
International & World Politics

Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War

A prominent historian exposes the dark side of making war more humane

In the years since 9/11, we have entered an age of endless war. With little debate or discussion, the United States carries out military operations around the globe. It hardly matters who’s president or whether liberals or conservatives operate the levers of power. The United States exercises dominion everywhere. […Learn More]

Book cover of National Service: A Generation in Uniform 1945-1963 by Richard Vinen
Europe

National Service: A Generation in Uniform 1945-1963

Richard Vinen’s National Service is a serious—if often very entertaining—attempt to get to grips with the reality of that extraordinary institution, which now seems as remote as the British Empire itself. With great sympathy and curiosity, Vinen unpicks the myths of the two “gap years,” which all British men who came of age between 1945 and the early 1960s had to fill with National Service. This book is fascinating to those who endured or even enjoyed their time in uniform, but also to anyone wishing to understand the unique nature of post-war Britain. […Learn More]

Civil War

Lincoln’s Code: The Laws of War in American History

In the closing days of 1862, just three weeks before Emancipation, the administration of Abraham Lincoln commissioned a code setting forth the laws of war for US armies. It announced standards of conduct in wartime—concerning torture, prisoners of war, civilians, spies, and slaves—that shaped the course of the Civil War. By the twentieth century, Lincoln’s code would be incorporated into the Geneva Conventions and form the basis of a new international law of war. […Learn More]

Book cover of The Gun, the Ship, and the Pen: Warfare, Constitutions, and the Making of the Modern World by Linda Colley
History

The Gun, the Ship, and the Pen: Warfare, Constitutions, and the Making of the Modern World

Vivid and magisterial, The Gun, the Ship, and the Pen reconfigures the rise of a modern world through the advent and spread of written constitutions.

A work of extraordinary range and striking originality, The Gun, the Ship, and the Pen traces the global history of written constitutions from the 1750s to the twentieth century, modifying accepted narratives and uncovering the close connections between the making of constitutions and the making of war. In the process, Linda Colley both reappraises famous constitutions and recovers those that have been marginalized but were central to the rise of a modern world. […Learn More]