Book cover of The Country of the Blind: A Memoir at the End of Sight by Andrew Leland
Biography & Autobiography

The Country of the Blind: A Memoir at the End of Sight

A witty, winning, and revelatory personal narrative of the author’s transition from sightedness to blindness and his quest to learn about blindness as a rich culture all its own

“The Country of the Blind is about seeing—but also about marriage and family and the moral and emotional challenge of accommodating the parts of ourselves that scare us. A warm, profound, and unforgettable meditation on how we adjust to new ways of being in the world.” —Rachel Aviv, author of Strangers to Ourselves […Learn More]

Book cover of When Crack Was King: A People's History of a Misunderstood Era by Donovan X. Ramsey

When Crack Was King: A People’s History of a Misunderstood Era

The crack epidemic of the 1980s and 1990s is arguably the least examined crisis in American history. Beginning with the myths inspired by Reagan’s war on drugs, journalist Donovan X. Ramsey’s exacting analysis traces the path from the last triumphs of the Civil Rights Movement to the devastating realities we live with today: a racist criminal justice system, continued mass incarceration and gentrification, and increased police brutality. […Learn More]

Book cover of The Viral Underclass: The Human Toll When Inequality and Disease Collide by Steven W. Thrasher
Health and Psychology

The Viral Underclass: The Human Toll When Inequality and Disease Collide

Having spent a ground-breaking career studying the racialization, policing, and criminalization of HIV, Dr. Thrasher has come to understand a deeper truth at the heart of our society: that there are vast inequalities in who is able to survive viruses and that the ways in which viruses spread, kill, and take their toll are much more dependent on social structures than they are on biology alone. […Learn More]

Book cover of His Name Is George Floyd: One Man's Life and the Struggle for Racial Justice by Robert Samuels
Biography & Autobiography

His Name Is George Floyd: One Man’s Life and the Struggle for Racial Justice 

A landmark biography by two prizewinning Washington Post reporters that reveals how systemic racism shaped George Floyd’s life and legacy—from his family’s roots in the tobacco fields of North Carolina, to ongoing inequality in housing, education, health care, criminal justice, and policing—telling the story of how one man’s tragic experience brought about a global movement for change. […Learn More]

Book cover of What My Bones Know: A Memoir of Healing from Complex Trauma by Stephanie Foo
Biography & Autobiography

What My Bones Know: A Memoir of Healing from Complex Trauma 

By age thirty, Stephanie Foo was successful on paper: She had her dream job as an award-winning radio producer at This American Life and a loving boyfriend. But behind her office door, she was having panic attacks and sobbing at her desk every morning. After years of questioning what was wrong with herself, she was diagnosed with complex PTSD—a condition that occurs when trauma happens continuously, over the course of years. […Learn More]

Book cover of The Man Who Could Move Clouds: A Memoir by Ingrid Rojas Contreras
Biography & Autobiography

The Man Who Could Move Clouds: A Memoir

For Ingrid Rojas Contreras, magic runs in the family. Raised amid the political violence of 1980s and ’90s Colombia, in a house bustling with her mother’s fortune-telling clients, she was a hard child to surprise. Her maternal grandfather, Nono, was a renowned curandero, a community healer gifted with what the family called “the secrets”: the power to talk to the dead, tell the future, treat the sick, and move the clouds. And as the first woman to inherit “the secrets,” Rojas Contreras’ mother was just as powerful. Mami delighted in her ability to appear in two places at once, and she could cast out even the most persistent spirits with nothing more than a glass of water. […Learn More]

Book cover of South to America: A Journey Below the Mason-Dixon to Understand the Soul of a Nation by Imani Perry
Biography & Autobiography

South to America: A Journey Below the Mason-Dixon to Understand the Soul of a Nation

We all think we know the South. Even those who have never lived there can rattle off a list of signifiers: the Civil War, Gone with the Wind, the Ku Klux Klan, plantations, football, Jim Crow, slavery. But the idiosyncrasies, dispositions, and habits of the region are stranger and more complex than much of the country tends to acknowledge. In South to America, Imani Perry shows that the meaning of American is inextricably linked with the South, and that our understanding of its history and culture is the key to understanding the nation as a whole. […Learn More]

Book cover of We Refuse to Forget: A True Story of Black Creeks, American Identity, and Power by Caleb Gayle
Americas

We Refuse to Forget: A True Story of Black Creeks, American Identity, and Power

A landmark work of untold American history that reshapes our understanding of identity, race, and belonging

In We Refuse to Forget, award-winning journalist Caleb Gayle tells the extraordinary story of the Creek Nation, a Native tribe that two centuries ago both owned slaves and accepted Black people as full citizens. Thanks to the efforts of Creek leaders like Cow Tom, a Black Creek citizen who rose to become chief, the U.S. government recognized Creek citizenship in 1866 for its Black members. […Learn More]