Civil War

The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory

The Lost Cause ideology that emerged after the Civil War and flourished in the early twentieth century in essence sought to recast a struggle to perpetuate slavery as a heroic defense of the South. As Adam Domby reveals here, this was not only an insidious goal; it was founded on falsehoods. The False Cause focuses on North Carolina to examine the role of lies and exaggeration in the creation of the Lost Cause narrative. […Learn More]

Book cover of Pulpit and Nation: Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America by Spencer McBride
History

Pulpit and Nation: Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America

In Pulpit and Nation, Spencer McBride highlights the importance of Protestant clergymen in early American political culture, elucidating the actual role of religion in the founding era. Beginning with colonial precedents for clerical involvement in politics and concluding with false rumors of Thomas Jefferson’s conversion to Christianity in 1817, this book reveals the ways in which the clergy’s political activism―and early Americans’ general use of religious language and symbols in their political discourse―expanded and evolved to become an integral piece in the invention of an American national identity. […Learn More]