Book cover of The Souls of Womenfolk: The Religious Cultures of Enslaved Women in the Lower South by Alexis Wells-Ogohoghomehby Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh
@AOghoghomeh

Beginning on the shores of West Africa in the sixteenth century and ending in the U.S. Lower South on the eve of the Civil War, Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh traces a bold history of the interior lives of bondwomen as they carved out an existence for themselves and their families amid the horrors of American slavery. With particular attention to maternity, sex, and other gendered aspects of women’s lives, she documents how bondwomen crafted female-centered cultures that shaped the religious consciousness and practices of entire enslaved communities. Indeed, gender as well as race co-constituted the Black religious subject, she argues—requiring a shift away from understandings of “slave religion” as a gender-amorphous category.

Interview with the Author

Podcast Art for the New Book NetworkNew Books Network
Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh, “The Souls of Womenfolk: The Religious Cultures of Enslaved Women in the Lower South” (UNC Press, 2021)
11/15/21           55 min


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